Several months ago we reported on an Indian-built Reva electric car that was crushed in Australia because the vehicle had never been crash tested. The same vehicles are sold in England as the G-Wiz and like the Zap Xebra sold in the United States it is exempt from crash testing. The three wheeled Xebra is classed as a motorcycle and in Europe there is a classification called quadricycles for light weight four wheeled vehicles.

Quadricycles are also exempt from the central London congestion charge and have become increasingly popular lately. British car magazine Top Gear decided to have one of the little battery powered vehicles put through the EuroNCAP (new car assessment program) crash test to see how well it does. The car was crashed into a barrier at 40 mph and the likelihood of the driver surviving was slim as shown in the photos above. The British government also tested a G-Wiz at 35mph and was so concerned with the results that they are now going to the European Commission to review the regulations for quadricycles, as we mentioned the other day.

The Top Gear site also has a video of the crash test. Fortunately some electrics, like those from Tesla and Phoenix, are being built to car safety standards and even NEVs in the US are subject to 25 mph crash tests.

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[Source: Top Gear, thanks to Gordon for the tip]