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"Bikestorming.org is about creating a systemic, global change on urban mobility for sustainable cities of the 21st century."

That's the short mission statement from an artist activist who wants to make bike riding the most popular transportation mode within the next 18 years. Besides cutting carbon dioxide and air pollution, biking is fun and can look very cool, says Mati Kalwill, creator of the Buenos Aires culture and activism group La Vida en Bici (Life on a Bike). Kalwill christened his new global mission Bikestorming, and its modus operandi is: "a collaboration platform to make bicycles the most popular form of urban transportation on the planet."

La Vida en Bici launched Bikestorming.org at Rio+20, the United Nation's Conference on Sustainable Development, which took place in late June in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For Bill McKibben of 350.org, an activist group committed to stopping climate change, the conference was a big downer and not much was accomplished. In the Bikestorming video available below, though, McKibben says he was happy to see the launch of Bikestorming.org, a movement to get the world's population to ride bikes for 51 percent of time they are using transportation by the year 2030. Lots of cities and cities and towns are pushing for it, and now it just needs to spread all over the planet, he said.

Kalwill says he is seeing bikes reaching a critical mass of awareness: "[Bikes] are on every politician's radar now. In the last year we've seen bicycle policy and infrastructure initiatives emerge in very diverse cities such as Mendoza, Rosario, Posadas, and Córdoba – as well as growing attention paid to bicycles in Buenos Aires' transportation policy and infrastructure."

In Buenos Aires, a city without any real bike culture historically, La Vida en Bici it making it cool to cycle. Will it work in areas where the car is king?