The Ford Focus Electric, which started sales in select east and west coast markets (read: California and New York/New Jersey) in November, won't be available to other U.S. markets until September, Ford Global Electric Vehicle Infrastructure associate director Mike Tinskey told MLive.

Tinskey, speaking after a panel discussion at the Automotive Megatrends USA 2012 conference in Ford's hometown of Dearborn earlier this month, said that the Focus Electric will be available to almost 80 percent of the country by this fall.

Ford, which hadn't set a deadline for when the Focus EV would debut outside of the coasts, started taking orders for the Focus Electric in November for initial market customers, and said at the time that it would expand sales to 15 other markets, including Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Seattle and Washington, D.C., by the end of 2012.

Ford, which has estimated that hybrids and plug-ins may account for as much as 25 percent of its vehicle sales by the end of the decade, has said that the Focus Electric has as much as a 100-mile single-charge range and estimated in December that the model will have a 100 miles-per-gallon-equivalent (MPGe) rating. That would make the Focus Electric the second-most "fuel efficient" production vehicle in the U.S. – Mitsubishi's battery-electric i has a 112 MPGe rating – and would put the Focus Electric's rating slightly ahead of the Nissan Leaf EVs' 99 MPGe rating.

Ford is starting pricing for the Focus Electric at $39,200, giving the car an out-of-pocket cost of as low as $31,700 once the $7,500 federal tax credit for electric vehicles is factored in and making it about $4,000 costlier than the Leaf.